Monthly Archives: March 2012

College & Career Readiness and Women in STEM

Dr. Jerry Adams is the Principal at New Deal High School, which is a T-STEM Academy. He’s written a wonderful blog this week for Ty Duncan at ESC 17 about college and career readiness and 21st Century skills. He discusses New Deal’s use of College Shirt Thursdays and Flex Fridays, and has a variety of ideas that they have implemented. Check out the blog at https://blogs.esc17.net/users/tduncan/. I agree with Jerry that it’s extremely important to prepare students for college and careers and to invest them with skills they will need to live in the 21st century. This knowledge will empower students.

I went to see The Hunger Games last weekend, and it reminded me of how much more powerful women appear not only in movies but in politics, the military, education–everywhere in modern life. Have you noticed the online info-graphics? One about girls in STEM education (http://www.engineeringdegree.net/girls-in-stem/) I found enlightening…especially the last comment: “In a room of 25 engineers, only 3 will be women.” If women are becoming more powerful, let’s empower them–all students, in fact–to becomes more active in STEM, especially in Engineering.

Kelton Visit & Educate Texas News

I know schools are preparing for STAAR next week, and I want to wish students, teachers, and schools success.

Beccy, Vinitha, Rich, and I are working with teachers and students in Kelton on a CPATH project funded by NSF. We visited Kelton this week to work with everyone a bit and answer any questions students and teachers had about the project. The students had written down questions before we arrived, and that was a great help. Their questions were very thoughtful and pertinent. Thanks to Jay Watson, Mary Burns, Roy Herndon, and Aletha Bentley, and all the students for making our trip so enjoyable.

Educate Texas had some articles about some of our Academies.

When I was in school, I was excited by our typing lab–rows of typewriters, and our teacher used a metronome to help us type rhythmically. Teachers were covered with chalk dust–especially the math teachers. And our homework was done by hand. Today’s students are involved in so many new and exciting things through STEM topics and PBL projects that it makes me wish I could start school all over again. Well…maybe not. The teen years were rather emotional, weren’t they?

WISE spring conference, the science of baseball, & Try Engineering

A few tidbits of news.

Women in Science Endeavors (WISE) is holding a conference for 6th, 7th, and 8th grade girls on Saturday, April 28, 2012, at the Science Spectrum in Lubbock. The girls will participate in four workshops. Registration must be received by March 26, and space is limited to the first 300 students. For more information, call James Nesmith at the Science Spectrum (806-745-2525 x 234).

I ran across a website called The Science of Baseball (http://www.exploratorium.edu/baseball/index.html). Tech just renovated Dan Law Field, and, heading back to my car one afternoon, I was startled at first to hear music and a voice because it seemed the renovation couldn’t possibly be complete. But, no, they are actually playing. Now it’s nice to walk to my car on a warm spring day and hear a bit of the game. Baseball has a very enticing sound that makes me want to get outside and enjoy life–hot dogs, watermelon, freshly mowed grass. If your students enjoy baseball, this site may provide you with some fun science lessons.

And, last but definitely not least, I found Try Engineering (http://tryengineering.org/). Our T-STEM Center is located at Texas Tech in the Whitacre College of Engineering, so naturally we encourage teachers to use engineering projects in K-12 schools. I’ve been reading that engineering jobs are plentiful, and entry-level positions often offer attractive salaries. But students, and possibly some teachers, are afraid that math and science demands of engineering will be too rigorous. Maybe websites such as Try Engineering can help with that perception. Engineering is really remarkable in that in uses science, technology, and math–all of the STEM curriculum. And it encourages students to try out their concepts and refine them over and over again.

Have a wonderful weekend, and I hope you enjoy the blog.